Saturday, April 25, 2015

April 25th, 2015 Tweets Handling Tonight

April 25th, 2015 Tweets Handling Tonight

Taking a rest day today and letting the Tweets handle tonight's blog.

My Tweets Today:
























Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

Friday, April 24, 2015

April 24th, 2015 The Trees, Clouds and Me

April 24th, 2015 The Trees, Clouds and Me

I took a nap incredibly late afternoon/early evening, after an exceptionally long day. The work day was capped off with a location broadcast from a car dealer. One of the big draws during the broadcast? Free cookies and soft drinks!

It's perfectly okay--and I'm beyond fine being around stuff like this. It truly doesn't entice me in the least, for reasons I've written extensively about of late.

That nap--yeah...a little after 6pm until almost 7:30pm. A friend of mine thought I was crazy. But I felt it necessary and that's what matters. Had it been a night before a 4:30am alarm, different story. I will sleep-in a little while tomorrow morning.

I hit the trail for a 5K tonight. I ended at 2.7 miles instead. It was just too late and I was feeling too tired. Three laps was good for me. I did something unusual out there tonight. Well, first of all--it's strange that this was the third Friday night in a row at the trail. A pattern seems to be developing. The unusual thing? I walked in silence. I did this a couple of times before a very long time ago while walking in the early morning. I wanted to hear the birds sing their morning songs.

Tonight, I was simply enjoying the stillness of my surroundings. I was the only soul out there and it was incredibly peaceful. It was breezy and cool with some low level clouds racing Northward at what seemed to be an unusually fast speed. The only things moving in the park tonight were the trees, the clouds and me.

Two different location broadcasts for my Saturday, so I better drop in bed.

Oh, one more thing. Leah, a regular reader and fantastic loyal supporter from Canada, posted a link on her Facebook page to a segment on the CBC television series, Marketplace. It was all about gluten free products. I'm aware that only 2% of people suffer from celiac disease--and these people must avoid gluten 100%, or they get incredibly sick, fast. The questions asked and answered revolved around, Is it necessary for non-celiacs? What's the financial and nutritional cost? What's fueling this massive trend toward g-free? It was extremely informative, entertaining and it helped me make a decision.

I'm ditching the gluten free products I sometimes use. I wasn't ever 100% gluten free anyway, so really, what was the point? I'm the first to admit I don't know everything about nutrition, not by a long shot. This report was eye opening. I really hate to admit being suckered in by the big marketing efforts behind g-free. For those with celiac disease or people with a milder discomfort known as gluten intolerance or for those who avoid wheat the same way I avoid sugar, gluten free is a great idea. For me, gluten free isn't necessary. I didn't realize tonight's g-free pasta would be my last, but I suppose it was.

OMGoodness...I must pick up some Joseph's Pitas this weekend!

My Tweets Today:
























Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

Thursday, April 23, 2015

April 23rd, 2015 The Most Refreshing Feeling

April 23rd, 2015 The Most Refreshing Feeling

Yesterday and today have been very special days to me. Yesterday's one year weigh-in and the tremendous outpouring of support and congratulations, was a tremendous blessing. I'm blessed. I'm grateful. And I honestly feel like I can say, without any doubt, without any fine print: I've given it my best effort. 

The spiritual support and the support of an army of others along this road have made it very clear to me, we're never alone. Even during the self-isolating nature of relapse and regain, we're not alone. It can certainly feel like it, but truly, we're not. When we open our heart, mind and eyes and we fully realize this, it's the most refreshing feeling. I'm going to be okay. I'm going to make it after all. Yes, you are going to make it.

How refreshing is that feeling, realizing it's going to be okay and you're really going to make it? Below is the text of an email I sent Marty Lerner Ph.D. at the Milestones program in Florida. Marty is a world renowned expert on food addiction. This email was dated March 27th, 2014, three and a half weeks before starting this turnaround in earnest, three and a half weeks before feeling renewed and refreshed.

Marty,

I think I may need in-patient treatment.
How much is inpatient treatment at your facility?
I likely can't afford it, but I wanted to see what's available.

Sincerely,

Sean Anderson

That was an email from someone throwing up his hands and saying, I can't do this on my own, I need help.  It was the beginning of yet another surrender, this time in the most humble and powerful of ways. I guess the trick is to just keep surrendering until you lose the things preventing a full and complete experience, for me, pride and ego. 

Life Coach Gerri Helms has been an angel to me. Gerri has twenty-one years of maintenance and twenty-one plus years of abstinence from sugar. That, is successful recovery. In all of her years, she's worked with many people through their struggles and successes along this road. She knew exactly what was happening even when I thought I was doing a fantastic job of pretending it was all okay, she knew better. And she wouldn't give up on me. She's a dear friend.
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Today marks 365 days of continuous tracking on MyFitnessPal. If you're on MFP, feel free to "friend" me, my username is: SeanAAnderson My food diary is public. If you ever see a meal tweet and you're curious about the particulars, you can find it in the diary.
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This is my happy/relieved/refreshed look. I'm so incredibly happy things have unfolded this way. Isn't it interesting how what is once perceived as one of the worst things, turns out to be a critically important element contributing to the development of the best things? 

It was a very busy day today. I haven't had a rest day from exercise in a week, so making today a rest day after seven days straight, was perfect. I didn't fully commit to it being a rest day until this evening. I was relaxing with a great cup of coffee and I thought, I really don't want to put my shoes on again. So I didn't.

One more thing before I turn out the lights and go to sleep. As reflective as the last two day's posts have been, this isn't necessarily a celebration, it's more of an acknowledgment--an opportunity to pause and be grateful, give thanks and continue on in the same way that brought me this far.

My Tweets Today:
















Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

April 22nd, 2015 Weigh Day Edition-One Year

April 22nd, 2015 Weigh Day Edition-One Year

Today was my 52 week weigh-in. Before we get to that, I thought I would go back in time to April 19th, 2014. That date was ten days after I stepped on the scale to see 394 staring back at me. It was happening. My worst fears were manifesting, quickly, with the encouragement of regular binge episodes, I was heading back to 500 pounds.

I was regularly trying to get a handle on it, but it was as if my hands were covered in grease. I couldn't get a solid grip. I would be okay, do well for a few days, even log my food, then crash, binge and give up, again, until something grabbed my attention, again.

This turnaround from relapse and regain over the last year has proven to be the most transforming for me, mentally and emotionally. Physically, too, sure, however--aside from the internal health benefits, the outward physical transformation in appearance is truly the least of it all. 

Let's go back to April 19th, last year...

There's an interesting psychological dynamic that unfolds when you lose a dramatic amount of weight and then gain some of it back, or a lot of it back.  I'm convinced this dynamic is exactly what makes successfully losing again seem more difficult. Suddenly, it becomes much more than controlling our calorie budgets, exercising and paying attention to our emotional state and the accompanying triggers. 

Now, we must do a little more "mental work" as we do our best to get past the guilt, shame and embarrassment associated with weight gain and put our focus squarely where it's most benefiting. This dynamic is powerful no matter if you blogged about your weight loss and wrote a book or not. 

I was in line at the grocery store the other day, fighting the urge to grab a dose of sugar, when a man came up behind me in line and said, "Sean Anderson, I read your book. You've gained some back."  

Two things happened in that moment: 1. I immediately lost any desire to grab a Snickers bar and 2. I felt a rush of guilt, shame and embarrassment.  Now, most people operate with a better set of filters. This scenario has played out more than a few times, but usually the other person doesn't vocalize the obvious.  Even when the obvious isn't stated, I'm real good at deciding exactly what they're thinking. The silent-mental conclusion is always much more harsh and unforgiving and likely inaccurate.

How will I ultimately overcome this added obstacle? Perspective. Shifting my perspective is paramount to my success today. 

Inventory time!  This is where I make a list of good and not as good, qualities...and you know what? I'll spare you the self-indulgent list and cut to the chase: Turns out I'm a pretty decent guy. Yay for that! 

I'm human. I'm real. I don't know everything. I'm always open to learning.  And the things I'm learning now are things crucial to my long term success.  I'm not saying weight gain after a dramatic loss was a good thing, but if I shift my perspective around I can clearly see where I can learn from and benefit from this experience.

As this blog moves forward, I'm going to get into more of a "diary" type mode, much like in the beginning. Less "here's what I think" and more "Here's what I did and am doing." I'm excited at the idea of getting back to the roots of this blog.  Back to a diary in the purest sense. 

You see, I tend to suffer from paralysis by analysis. I try to understand things from every angle, take it apart, dissect the elements, reach conclusions, maybe write about my personal philosophical conclusions and then when I struggle, it's back to the drawing board.  We can study ourselves and learn, learn, learn--the applying part is the critical step that's often times hindered by the exhaustive analysis. 

Much like advice I've given a hundred times to others: It's time to stop trying to figuring everything out and just do. Just be. And be okay. And move forward.
---------------------------
I'm incredibly grateful for this entire experience, even the relapse and regain. Without this path, I would have missed out on the good stuff. The stuff I needed to learn, the stuff I needed to appreciate.

And there's still more stuff to learn along the way as I proceed toward maintenance mode, quickly, with the encouragement of the fundamental elements I hold sacred each day.
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Another 5 pounds down for this three week period, bringing the 52 week total to 152 pounds.

Days like today send me into a heightened sense of focus and determination. I do better at my job, I reach out more, offering and receiving support, I eat well and exercise in a crazy fun lip syncing zone where I block out anyone and anything around me and I just get deep into the music. I swear, the regulars at the Y probably think I'm crazy. And that's okay. I'll be the crazy guy who lip syncs on the elliptical and takes pictures while refilling his bottle of water, all day long.  

I'm also aware that not every day will be like this day. It's never been a constant string of great days. And when the blues come a callin' again and everything seems off center and on tilt, it'll be up to me to lean on my fellow travelers for the critical support I need to make it to another great day.

My Tweets Today:


























Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

April 21st, 2015 Feel And Deal

April 21st, 2015 Feel And Deal

I've discovered I can still be under general stress with work, finances or anything else life throws my way, and simultaneously feel genuine excitement about what I'm doing in taking exceptional care and about where I'm headed. It's noteworthy because there was a time when I thought everything needed to be perfect in my life before I could somehow experience success with weight loss. How does a lifetime stress and emotional eater successfully lose weight? 

Turning to food for comfort and escape became my solution for most everything. Only if my back was up against the wall or I felt cornered would I actually deal with something head on. This pattern resulted in a bunch of unresolved issues over the years and it kept me "comfortably" in the 500 pound range.

One of the many epiphanies helping me get started on this weight loss path in September 2008 was the realization that losing weight would require putting down my shield. I would need to feel and deal with things in a different way. Deep down, I knew the excess food wasn't helping anything. I wasn't eating for it to help. I was eating as an escape to something pleasurable, a distraction from the unpleasurable. Food helped me do that. But it didn't help the issues creating the stress and emotions in the first place.

Food isn't a therapist. 

Once I fully appreciated and understood this and what it meant, I really thought--okay, that's it, I'm fixed!! I'll never do that ever again!! Well, famous last words, huh? 

A combination of emotional issues and stress overwhelmed me after maintaining my initial weight loss for a year and a half and just like that, I intentionally ignored the truths of what I had learned. I stopped being accountable, I stopped writing, I turned my back on support, I stopped caring about whether or not I was handling things appropriately and I started isolating...and eating.

Some of the powerful epiphanies along this road cannot be forgotten. As in, you can't un-know them. You can't see and experience the truth, then ignore the truth, without the truth nagging at you every step of the way. Someone once said, "recovery is a buzz kill." Very true. I could no longer wallow in pure unadulterated oblivion, doing what always came natural, without constantly being reminded of what was really happening.

Tomorrow morning is my 52 week weigh-in and Thursday will be Day 365 of this turnaround from relapse and regain. I've learned volumes more about me over the last year. I've learned about what it really means and feels like to apply a sacred level of importance to this recovery process.

In order to be successful, long term, I must give the elements of what works for me the same reverence an alcoholic in successful recovery gives theirs.

I thought I realized the power of support before, but oh wow, I've been gifted an entirely fresh and powerful perspective on the importance of giving and receiving good support.

When I say "I'm excited about where I'm headed," it's for so many different reasons than before. I'm not most excited because of a new pair of jeans that will fit soon. I'm not most excited about some hot new romance someday. I'm not most excited about the success of my future projects or the desire to eventually make writing, mentoring and public speaking what I do full time.

Nope.

I'm most excited about once again approaching maintenance mode, and this time with a grounded and completely different perspective firmly rooted in solid recovery principals. With an understanding and full appreciation that I'm never cured. Relapse and regain humbled me in a most beautiful way. I needed the experience. I'm grateful.

My Tweets Today:


















Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

Monday, April 20, 2015

April 20th, 2015 Sign Of Growth

April 20th, 2015 Sign Of Growth

I spent quite a bit of time replying to emails and comments this evening. Thank you, sincerely, for each and every one.

This entire experience has been incredibly rewarding. When I recently included a flashback excerpt from a year ago, right before returning to daily postings, one of my favorite parts was "it might get a little boring." This was my way of alleviating a self imposed need or pressure, if you will, to explore and elaborate nightly on anything and everything related to this road so many of us travel.

I've experienced and learned so much along the way, sometimes I can't help myself and I must share what's on my mind. It helps me dissect things and truly understand how it applies to and informs my entire experience. Some of it might not apply to you and some of it might hit you square.

I always look forward to sitting down and writing without constantly checking the time and hurrying along. Other times, like tonight, I have to call myself in from the pleasure of writing with a big, "it's time to go to bed!" This is a sign of growth in me over the last year or so.

Including the Live Tweets from the day in each post has been a big help!

My Tweets Today:






















Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

Sunday, April 19, 2015

April 19th, 2015 Another Sugar Free Post

April 19th, 2015 Another Sugar Free Post

This weekend didn't go quite as planned, but that happens. I made needed adjustments and made it through in fine form. It was a really good weekend in a lot of ways. I feel strong.

I've written extensively about the difference abstinence from sugar has made in my life. I'm serious when I say it is the single most important nutritional decision I've ever made. It's been a life changer. Turning off the "binge switch," receiving a peace and calm like I've never known, is very real. Before I gave it an honest attempt, I listened to people share their amazing experience, I read blogs and articles all describing the benefits. I didn't fully appreciate any of it until I experienced it first hand.

My sugar abstinence is just a few days shy of a year old. My commitment only gets stronger each day. I was eating lunch recently with a loved one who ordered a dessert and then told me how horrible they felt eating it in front of me, because "I know you can't have any." I assured them it was perfectly okay and their dessert wasn't bothering me in the least.

The truth is, If I wanted it, and I didn't mind sacrificing everything important to me, I could have it. I've worked too hard turning my relapse and regain around to give it all back, again. And it's that kind of importance level that will help keep me in successful recovery.

I don't want it. And it's not about will power. I've written this before--and it's very true: Will power is only used when you're resisting something you desperately want. If you don't want it--with zero desire, will power isn't employed. I don't eat broccoli, ever. I tried it one time. It isn't will power that keeps me away from broccoli. I don't like it and I don't want it--that's what keeps me away.

When I see sugar, I see poison. It doesn't take will power for me to resist ingesting poison. All it takes is knowing that it's poison to me. It isn't poison to everyone, mind you, but for me, yes...it is, very much.

I wouldn't dare trade what I've found for all the Snickers Bars on the planet. You could eat the most decadent dessert in the world, right in front of my face and it wouldn't bother me in the least. People bring donuts and cinnamon rolls to work occasionally--doesn't phase me. Girl Scout Cookies--FREE Girl Scout Cookies lived in our kitchen at work for the longest time before somebody finished them off or threw them away, I don't know which--but I do know I faced them each and every day as I prepared my breakfast and lunch in that kitchen and not once did I have a twinge of struggle toward them. Each day I abstain, my commitment grows stronger.

I'm always delighted when I run across someone else experiencing the same life changing effects of sugar abstinence. Recently, a friend posted a link to the blog www.300poundsdown.com on my Facebook wall. It was a link to this post:
http://www.300poundsdown.com/2015/04/the-power-is-returning.html

I enjoyed reading every single word of her post. The enthusiasm--the sheer excitement she expresses because of her experience, was a most wonderful read. Her experience with abstinence from sugar mirrors mine down to the letter. I immediately asked for her permission to share it here and add her blog to my blog roll along the left hand side of the page. Holly got back with me today and gave an enthusiastic yes! I hope you'll read her post. It's beautifully written.

I did more weather coverage at the radio station today. Just when I thought I might need to employ a Plan B for exercise, the storms moved on, replaced with a cool calm--and just enough time for me to get into the YMCA for a workout before their 6pm closing time.

My dinner tonight (see tweet below) was the second time I've made the dish and it's immediately one of my favorites!

My Tweets Today:






















Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

Saturday, April 18, 2015

April 18th, 2015 From This Day Forward

April 18th, 2015 From This Day Forward

Today turned a little busy for me. My plan to get into the YMCA for my workout was preempted by weather coverage duties at the studio. I did get a break early evening for exercise plan B. I made my way to the park for a 5K walk, then to the store and home to prepare dinner, before going back to work to cover more storms. We didn't get anything serious at all, but the potential threat was present.

I planned on spending more time writing this blog post tonight. But I'll hold my thoughts until tomorrow night's edition.

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If I could get in a time machine and go back 40 years, I would fire the person who gave me this haircut. Me at 3. No reason, other than I know it's one of my mom's favorite portraits.

Wednesday is weigh day. It'll also be the one year anniversary of this turnaround from relapse/regain and the one year anniversary of Live-Tweeting my food and exercise every day as an accountability measure. Friday the 24th will be the one year anniversary of my return to daily blog post updates.

DDWL Flashback: From April 24th, 2014...

...putting our puzzle together requires more than just having the knowledge of what we do and why we do it, it requires deliberate actions. Simply having a good idea of where the pieces fit doesn't solve the puzzle, you gotta get hands on those pieces--you gotta be willing to physically work the puzzle.  Is it always easy? NO.  Will we get stuck occasionally? YES.  Do we give up and wipe the puzzle into the floor? NEVER.

And from this day forward, this blog will be about deliberate actions. If you've read from the beginning of this blog or at least part of the first couple of years, you'll recognize exactly what it is.  A daily diary.  Now...I can't guarantee I won't go off on a philosophical tangent every now and again, because it comes very easy for me to do---and I'll occasionally get creative--but for the most part, it could get a little boring along the way...at least until you see what's happening and how it's unfolding.

Those were definitely determined words! From this day forward. Indeed. Until next time (in less than 24 hours), my friend.

My Tweets Today:




















Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

Friday, April 17, 2015

April 17th, 2015 I Fried The Circuits

April 17th, 2015 I Fried The Circuits

I don't know when it happened. At some point, I believe, I fried the circuits responsible for regulating my body weight. I hit 500 pounds before age 20 and although it took a lot of over-eating, late night fourth (and fifth) meal eating, an occasional binge and zero intentional exercise to accomplish this, I didn't consider the quantity of food at any one setting should have warranted such a morbidly obese body weight.

I remember reading an article when I was twelve years old about the worlds heaviest man. Reading about his typical day of food just wasn't ever me, at twelve--at twenty, or thirty-five. A dozen eggs, a pound of bacon and a loaf of bread for breakfast? In my late teen years, as the scale crept above 500, I'm sure some might have imagined I had similar eating habits, but no, never did. Perhaps I just spread mine out a little more. But here's the kicker:

At a certain point, I stopped gaining. My body settled between 500 and 515 for years on end while I did absolutely nothing to lose weight or maintain the weight. It was as if I found my body's "set point." And it seems this is where my fried body-weight regulating circuits want me to be, naturally.

I have zero doubt, if it wasn't for this turnaround period from relapse/regain over the last year, I would be back between 500 and 515 by now. Not a shred of doubt. I was headed that way in a hurry.

Recently, a medical paper was published in the Journal Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. And it was written about in a CBS News Interactive piece by Jessica Firger. Below is an excerpt from the article:

"Although lifestyle modifications may result in lasting weight loss in individuals who are overweight, in those with chronic obesity, body weight seems to become biologically 'stamped in' and defended," Dr. Christopher Ochner, lead author and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, said in a press statement.

The authors of the paper say we need to change the way we think and talk about obesity, and use language reflective of the fact that being morbidly obese is a chronic disease. Like addictions to drugs and alcohol, patients can overcome it but shouldn't expect to be "cured."

"Few individuals ever truly recover from obesity; rather they suffer from 'obesity in remission,'" Ochner says. "They are biologically very different from individuals of the same age, sex, and body weight who never had obesity."

Those of us with chronic obesity have a body weight that is "stamped in and defended." Sounds very familiar to me. I wasn't surprised when I read the article. Not one bit. I knew about this from living it.

It's incredibly easy for me to regain weight. If I suddenly stopped intentionally exercising and tracking my consumption, even without binge episodes, I truly believe my weight would consistently creep upward. Maybe not as fast as it did in the middle of binge city-relapse/regain, but with the same ultimate destination between 500 and 515 pounds.

So now what? Are we doomed to gain it all back because that's the curse of chronic obesity? Is there any hope at all?

First of all, there is hope for long term recovery. I know people who have done it (maintained their weight loss) for ten, twenty and nearly thirty years. It does take work. And no, it's not fair. And that's precisely where our success starts.

Acceptance. If I'm constantly resistant of the elements I must practice each day because it's not fair that so and so can eat a truck full of food and never gain an ounce, then I'm in big trouble.

It is what it is. I've discovered the quicker this acceptance is fully embraced the quicker I can continue enjoying life at a healthy body weight. Something so effortless to some requires daily attention and diligence for someone like me.

They key, I believe, is finding a way--a plan you can truly enjoy. If you read this blog regularly, you see everything I eat. I do not feel deprived in the least. I love what I'm eating. And it's plenty.

I've set the boundaries of my plan and I hold them sacred. I must always hold them sacred. No sugar, daily food tracking and calorie budget management, regular exercise and most importantly, support. Exchanging support with people like me who are in this deal right along side, is critically important. Writing this daily blog is also a strong source of support and accountability.

Acceptance to me, means these elements of my recovery become more than habit, they become woven into the fabric of my life, for the rest of my life. There isn't a finish line. There isn't a declaration of some big final victory. I must never try to live someone else's normal. I must live my normal. This is my normal. And you know what? It's all good, even with the set point weight my body tries to gravitate toward if I don't stay on top of it.  

My Tweets Today:




















Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

Thursday, April 16, 2015

April 16th, 2015 Again Someday

April 16th, 2015 Again Someday

My Thursday started with feeling sick. I actually called in sick before realizing, I wasn't running a fever and there was entirely too much going on to not be there. If I could possibly make it, I needed to go. I sucked it up and made my way into work.

I took a slow and easy approach with food today. In fact, I ended with less than 1,300 and my net calories after exercise calories burned was ridiculously low. But it's okay. I allowed a late dinner tonight. After entering everything, there wasn't any way I was adding another 400 calories before bed. The great news is, I feel much better. About 6pm, I knew I was getting a workout this evening. I wasn't sure before because I wasn't going to go with a general sickness about me.

I have wanted to dig my mind and keyboard into two topics this week and I'm still needing to wait until the weekend. Uhg! Frustrating! But, I'm doing the right thing by getting to bed on a work night, instead. I must remember, my livelihood, what keeps the lights on and food in my grocery basket, is my broadcasting job. I mustn't forget to do what I need to do, in order to give my job the effort and attention it needs. I'm so passionate about what I do within these pages, I sometimes forget very important things.

I'll have the opportunity this weekend to cover both topics in successive nights, easily.

I've been giving more and more thought lately about my maintenance plan. I feel like I'm getting extremely close. These size 36 Old Navy jeans are getting baggy and loose.

Of course, an Old Navy 36 is a Lee Jeans 38, is a Levi 501's 40. Isn't it interesting how different labels interpret sizes? Shouldn't there be a standard of some sort? Is Old Navy trying to flatter me? Is Levi Strauss being a jerk? Is Lee Jeans the only sane one? This is one of the many random things I occasionally think about.

The accountability measures and support structure will remain steady. The calorie bank will increase as will the weight training and other workouts. I'm starting to think about it each day. And that's a good thing.    

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#tbt The fall of 2009 found me on stage fulfilling my desire to act on stage. I was right around the 200 pounds lost point in this Throw Back Thursday photo. I remember falling below 300 pounds during rehearsals. I would have never even thought of auditioning at my heaviest. Getting one of the lead parts in "Call Me Henry" was incredible. I remember hanging up the phone and getting emotional after the director called and told me I had the part. I so badly want to do it again someday.

My Tweets Today:


















Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean





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